Birth Partners can be a game changer when it comes to your birth… want to know why?

I’m a firm believer that birth partners can make a huge impact on our birth experiences and I often say that birth is about team work with there being so many ways that they can support.

Its one of my favourite parts of being a birth coach because I know that through doing a hypnobirthing course, it can significantly increase everyone’s confidence and there really is no better feeling than getting feedback from a family saying that their partner was their rock during birth.

Why do birth partners make such a big difference during birth?

With the mother or parent focusing on labouring or birthing their baby a birth partner is often in the best position to be able to advocate, guide and a support during the birth process.

During birth preparation classes, it gives you and your birth support team the dedicated time and space to chat through anything that your considering for your birth – and honestly, I think its on of the most valuable parts of pregnancy planning!

So many people that I’ve chatted with often think that their birth partner wont enjoy doing a hypnobirthing course but I’m yet to come across one who didn’t… and I’ve taught over 300!

It gives them a really clear role, helps them to see and understand ways that they can really support you and whilst everyone is different – there are a few key things that I’ve noticed people say time and time again when it comes to how their birth partner supported them through hypnobirthing.

Here are some tips for birth partners to confidently prepare for birth

Tip 1 – Learn about the birth journey and what tends to happen during labour

When asking birth partners what they find most useful about our hypnobirthing sessions – its often chatting about the birth process and how they can support.

We often see a change in body language as we get closer to birthing our babies and birth partners being able to spot the changes can be really helpful in terms of the way that birth partner support might change throughout labour.

Often just being there, in the space is enough for the mother or parent to focus on their birth, feeling safe and secure.

Tip 2 – Really invest in understanding what your partners birth preferences are

A birth plan or birth preferences are for everyone involved in the birth, yet the real purpose is for you to explore your options and what feels right for you and your baby.

A birth partner can advocate for you so that you can focus on staying in your birthing zone and through working through the birth preferences together, it can really help your birth partner to understand the reasons for your choices.

Often, parents to be might discuss different scenarios such as induction and caesarean birth and this can really help to build your confidence not only in the fact that hypnobirthing is great for all types of birth but in the fact that it can help you to feel protected and in control in what you want.

Often when speaking with couples, I say have a think about what your givens are regardless of the type of birth. For example, skin to skin with your baby as soon as possible.

Tip 3 – Understand the importance of environment and how our birthing h

Our environment is actually one of the biggest contributing factors to consider when it comes to birth as it can have a significant impact on how the labour or birth happens.

There’s loads of things we can do to change our environment and again, birth partners are often in the best place to set this up or have conversations with others to ensure the space feels calm and right for you.

During The Happy Little Nest hypnobirthing and antenatal classes, we also explore how the maternity care system tends to work as it gives us a really good understanding of why things are in place.

Many procedures are created on a one size fits all basis and during hypnobirthing sessions, we explore how to advocate and do what feels right for you and often its our birth team that supports us with this throughout birth.

Tip 4 – Feel confident around asking questions so that you can relay important information back to your partner

This is often a big one, having some tools to feel confident about asking questions which you might want answering to make an informed choice is so important to birthing parents.

It might be but that you never need to ask questions, but having the tools ready can often help birth partners to feel confident and therefore helps us to feel more in control to let go.

Tip 5 – Trust your partner, trust their intuition during birth

This is a big one. In our society, we’ve often relied a lot on hearing stories, watching tv or have the impression that birth is an urgent medical even when in fact, birth is a very safe event.

A mothers instinct, a fathers instinct or a parents instinct in labour is strong and its important that we learn to listen and support because ultimately – its always the person whose giving births choice in what to do.

Were these tips useful?

I really hope that you find this information useful, feel free to send the link to your birth partner or share with someone who is pregnant.

If your looking for birth preparation courses in Leeds, Bradford, Harrogate or online, I’d really recommend that you have a bit of a read about how The Happy Little Nest hypnobirthing courses can support you.

I’m really passionate not only about supporting families to prepare for a vaginal birth but for a caesarean birth and have created a variety of courses to support you.

Hypnobirthing covers many areas of antenatal preparation which will help you and your birth partner to prepare confidently for the birth of your baby!

How can hypnobirthing help me in labour and birth? Here’s 10 ways..

One of the things that I absolutely love about hypnobirthing is that there really is something for everyone when it comes to looking for tools to prepare for your baby’s birth.

When your considering different forms of antenatal preparation for the birth of your baby – hypnobirthing can help both physically and mentally.

So here are just a few of the ways it can play a huge roll during labour and birth.

1 – It helps you to understand that your mind has a lot more influence over your body

Its true, our mind and our body are essentially the same thing and when it comes to pregnancy and birth – having an understanding of the way that our body can be impacted during birth can really help us to see why a relaxation toolkit… aka.. a hypnobirthing toolkit can be a great idea.

If you think about it, our mind controls so many reactions within our body – like when you find something funny, you laugh. You don’t stop and then think to laugh!

Well its the same in labour, if we feel safe we can let go in order to birth our babies.

2 – Hypnobirthing provides you with a variety of tools that help you to feel calm in a variety of different birthing scenarios

Home birth, induced birth, caesarean birth, hospital birth, freebirth… the list goes on – regardless of the type of birth you are planning for – there are loads of different tools that you can try to help you to prepare for birth.

That’s what I love about hypnobirthing – everyone will use the tools different.

In my hypnobirthing sessions, I break the toolkit down into 3 sections – mind tools such as visualisation, physical tools such as items that can change your environment and breathing techniques

3 – It helps you to understand your body and therefore helps you to work with it instead of against it

I don’t know about you but I didn’t have a clue how my body worked in labour before I had Charlotte. Having an understanding of the purpose of contractions, how our uterus works in labour and how we change in our behaviour as labour progresses can help build your trust in the process.

Birth is a biological requirement and just like with so many other bodily functions.. it just happens.

Also understanding a bit around birth positions, particularly ones that help you work with gravity and support yourself and your baby to birth can give you the confidence that you were designed to do this!

4- Hypnobirthing helps your birth partner to gain confidence in how to support you during birth

Hypnobirthing can be just as useful for your birth partner, after working with hundreds of families – its been really great to see how it can make all the difference to your birth partner.

It can help them see that they do have a really important role during birth and opens up conversations about the different ways that they can support whether that’s through setting up your birth environment or advocating for you during labour.

5 – It can help you tune into your instincts

Often, having an understanding of our bodies along with relaxation techniques helps us to tune into our instincts easier during labour – its often said that hypnobirthing mamas or parents stay at home longer before going to the hospital as they know its not yet time.

It can also help with choosing birthing positions, making decisions in labour and tuning into your baby.

One of the most important things I talk about in my sessions is instinct – for many years, we have almost learnt to not trust our instincts during birth and this doesn’t need to be the case.

6 – It can help you feel confident about advocating for yourself not only in pregnancy but during birth too

A really key part of a hypnobirthing course is understanding how to advocate for yourself during labour and birth.

Sadly, our maternity care system is currently quite stretched with many policies and procedures in place that don’t always work on an individualised basis and this can mean that some parents want further information or a different care pathway.

Whilst hypnobirthing isn’t about giving you advice, a key element is educating you on how to feel confident on knowing your rights.

7 – It can help you to write birth preferences based on what really matters to you

Completing a hypnobirthing course often provides you with most of the information you’d like to write in your birth plans as a hypnobirthing course can really help to highlight ways that you want your birth to look and feel.

This can also be useful for both your birth partner as a tool they can use to advocate for you as well as your caregivers such as a midwife or doctor.

8 – It can help you to feel more comfortable as your labour progresses

During a hypnobirthing course, we will go through loads of techniques that can help you to feel more comfortable as your labour progresses – whether that’s through learning massage techniques that can help ease any discomfort , breathing techniques to help your muscles to relax and active birth positions that you can use for resting or however you feel during labour.

9 – It helps you to understand the different stages of labour and how best to prepare your environment

Often birth partners I work with say that this has been one of the most useful parts of the course as it helps them to understand what to look for in terms of a change in your body language.

We will talk about things like setting up your environment, how to adapt it in different locations if your choosing to birth outside of the home and also things like what to expect when your placenta is born.

10 – It can provide you with confidence and excitement

And of course, last but certainly not least!

This is the whole reason why hypnobirthing exists – to help you to feel more in control of your birth!

Many parents that I’ve worked with often say that our hypnobirthing course has helped them to feel empowered about their choices and for me – this is the ultimate goal as a hypnobirthing teacher!

Elizabeth’s Positive Birth Pool Story, Baby Ben – 2nd Baby

It’s been a little while as we’ve been settling in, but I just wanted to update you on how our birth went! 

I started with regular surges on the morning of Wednesday 19th of April and things hadn’t ramped up much by the Thursday evening, so I called the hospital who said I could pop in for an examination to see how things were progressing. We took all our bags just in case, which was lucky as they asked us to stay in and I got the pool room that I missed out on last time when I was induced with Sophie.

I had the time to set up my hypnobirthing space, with photos, birth affirmations, fairy lights and forest sounds (which I’d been practising and relaxing with since our session). Nathan was incredibly supportive, making sure I had everything I needed and encouraging me through the surges, which carried on for a few more hours at which point the midwife said we could go home if we preferred. I trusted my body though and decided to stay, we managed to take a short nap and when I woke up the surges were getting more intense – I cracked on my music playlist (everything from Blink 182 to Pantera haha!) and stayed active, breathing through the surges. We put the water in the pool at around 11, which really helped me to relax and take some weight off. I also started squeezing my comb at this point (great tip!) as things got more intense.

Our baby boy Ben arrived at 1:29am on the Friday after lots of slow, controlled pushing. I got away with no stitches or tears using the breathing exercises we’d talked about.

The midwives commented afterwards that they’d not seen such a calm and beautiful waterbirth (not that it felt anything like that to me at the time, I definitely made a lot of racket!) which makes me so proud looking back on it. As a very anxious and self-critical person, I tend to focus on everything I think I should be doing better so this was really lovely to hear, and I’ve drawn a lot of courage from it over the past few weeks, which I’ve found really hard.

I can say with certainty that our session with you gave me the confidence and tools to have such an amazing and positive birth experience, which I’ll always be able to look back on as a wonderful memory. What an incredible gift – thank you from the bottom of my heart.

Different ways to create a positive birth mindset in pregnancy

When I first started preparing for Charlottes birth.. I never really understood why this mattered.

Until I understood what a difference our mind has on the rest of our body.

Our mind is an incredibly powerful thing and when I started to unpick a lot of my fears about birth – they had come from a place of watching too much rubbish tv or other people talking about birth in a negative way around me as a kid.

So when I fell pregnant.. I knew I had work to do.

To overcome a lot of these deeply imbedded anxieties that I’d built up for as long as I could remember.

Creating a positive mindset for birth is very individual… some people already might have some great foundations in place (this is how it absolutely should be!) and some people like me need to explore and find a variety of tools to help build up confidence (you are not alone if this is the way you feel).

As part of my hypnobirthing and antenatal courses, we explore a variety of topics which help you to start to build up that positive mindset.

That might be through understanding how birth works. Or connecting with your birth partner. Or in the case of hypnobirthing, it might be developing a variety of tools that help you to feel calm and in control.

Connecting all of these dots together for many people can make a HUGE difference in their mindset, because it proves to them that they do have more control than what they originally thought.

Here are just a few ways that you can start to build up that positive mindset ready to give birth to your baby –

Working with a birth partner – Chat with your birth partner about what’s important to you when it comes to preparing for birth, tell them how they can best support you to start to build up your birth toolkit

Affirmations – Affirmations are a really quick and easy way to start to build up a positive mindset. Writing a statement in the present tense about pregnancy or birth and reading it every day will start to have a positive impact on your subconscious . Even if you don’t believe the statement to begin with, its a really great way to start to build up a practice.

Reading positive birth stories – This might be one that you want to do straight away or leave until your later on in your pregnancy, reading about different types of birth in a positive way will prove to you that you too can absolutely do it!

Visualisation – Thinking about birth in a positive way, visualising what it might look like can help you to reframe your mind. It’s a bit like playing out what it might be like to walk into an interview, its helping your mind to mentally prepare (there are loads of ways to use visualisation, this tends to be a favourite amongst my clients).

Protecting your space – Out of all of them, I’d probably say that this is the most important. Being mindful of other people in your space and what they are talking about when it comes to your birth can be really important (and hard). I often had people coming up to me trying to tell me their horror stories about birth or trying to tell me what I needed to do during labour and eventually I learned to either switch off from it ask people to change the subject. This way, I could protect my space and focus on birth preparation that made me happy!

What’s it like to have a caesarean after a vaginal birth? 

This is probably one of the questions I get asked the most, not only by clients but from other birth workers and even my family and friends! 

I guess for many people, they might experience one or the other (don’t forget that vaginal birth is absolutely possible after an abdominal birth!). 

So what did I find from both of my birth experiences? 

Before the birth 

In terms of preparation, both of my children were born prematurely so I hadn’t really fully gotten things ready at home and it also meant that I did end up having conversations with obstetrics (only as my waters broke with Charlotte but of course at length with Williams birth due to my diagnosis of ICP / requesting a caesarean. 

I had been incredibly focused on my hypnobirthing techniques and had written my birth plans and I was incredibly focused on staying within my zone when it came to both of my babies – their labours started in exactly the same way and whilst Charlotte’s labour progressed, I became quite unwell with a gallstone attack (this was undiagnosed at the time) and therefore I found that I really needed to prepare for Williams birth in a completely different way.

With a vaginal birth, it almost felt like completely letting go whereas with a caesarean – the build up felt the opposite. I was wanting to chat through my options and whilst I felt it important to stay in my zone – I almost wanted the distraction of talking to friends, family and my doula whilst I waited to go down to the theatre. 

The Birth 

I loved labour, I felt incredibly in tune with my body and I very much felt the same during William’s birth too – I felt incredibly connected to my babies and really tuned into my instincts to help lead me to do what I felt was right. 

Charlotte was born in a hospital and whilst the room had quite a medicalised look and feel – I was able to switch my mind off and stay focused on being in my birthing zone and this was still so important for me when it came to Williams birth – I’d never been in a theatre before and I was determined that whilst having a spinal block I stay focused, whilst preparing for the caesarean to start, there was a moment where I felt a little out of control and my breathing and visualisation helped me just as powerfully as it had done during Charlotte’s vaginal birth. 

Craig, my husband, played a huge role in the births of both of our children – he was my primary focus just as both of our babies were born. We worked as a team and whilst there were more checks done on William after his birth – we were very quickly able to create our little nook. 

The one thing I would say about having a caesarean was that I did feel quite frustrated that I just wanted to move my arms and hold my baby easily – I totally got and understood why it was harder.. I’d just say it probably was one of the things that I found the hardest having experienced so much freedom to move about when Charlotte was born. Again, just focusing on cuddling William and being with Craig really made all the difference. 

The Postpartum Period 

This is the area that I get asked about the most – what’s it like to recover from a caesarean compared to a vaginal birth. 

One thing I need to say is that the circumstances around my second birth were very different compared to my first, I was suffering with undiagnosed gallstones which had resulted in multiple organ issues so I did end up having 2 surgeries within 6 weeks of William’s birth which did mean my recovery probably felt quite different…

This might sound weird but there were elements I felt so much happier with when it came to caesarean birth recovery – life was slower, I spent more time resting and relaxing in skin to skin with William in bed. I felt nurtured and held by my midwives, doula, Craig and family and friends – I genuinely believe that this slower period helped me to recover both physically and mentally from a very challenging 2 months. 

The recovery from the caesarean birth wasn’t actually as scary as what I thought it would be. At first standing up and walking around felty quite daunting, yet I very quickly gained my confidence – I get why people said it was important to walk about as soon as I was able, it really helped me build my confidence up straight away. 

Charlotte’s birth was a physiological vaginal birth with a few small stitches, I’ve got to admit, being a first time mum it was more the anxiety of not knowing what was normal which I found quite difficult (again, this did impact me a little bit after a caesarean with my 2nd birth as it was my first experience!).

Overall, both of my experiences were really positive with my taking care of my stitches, listening to my body and seeking out advice from my GP and midwives if I needed reassurance.

My biggest tips from experiencing both types of birth 

Have an action plan on how you can use your hypnobirthing anchors for different birthing scenarios.

Chat with your birth partner and midwife about your birth preferences and the ways you want them to support you. 

Have a bit of a plan for the postpartum period and consider what your recovery might look like and how to reach out to others.

Remember that your breathing techniques really are the best tool in all types of birth

You are very much in the driver’s seat regardless of the type of birth – everything is always your choice.

Why is hypnobirthing called hypnobirthing?

I get asked this question by mums, dads and parents to be all the time – why is hypnobirthing called hypnobirthing?

I’ll admit – when I first heard the name, I was a bit sceptical I genuinely thought it was a bit of a random name for an antenatal class.

Even when I first started teaching and parents to be were coming to baby shops to look for pushchairs and next to me cots, I was there running stalls – as soon as they saw the banner with hypnobirthing on, they would lower their heads and their gaze and quickly shuffle past!

Still makes me laugh now because pretty much everyone sees the logic in it once they now what its all about.

Hypnobirthing gets its name from hypnosis, I know what your thinking.. hypnosis.. the one where magicians can get you to do things on stage?!

Waving a watch in front of your face?

No, absolutely not.. that’s stage hypnosis and it has nothing to do with how hypnosis can help you to prepare for the birth of your baby.

Hypnosis is almost like a meditation – words written in a specific way to help you to feel relaxed. That’s what I often call the hypnosis tracks that I record for the parents to be taking my hypnobirthing courses – relaxation tracks.

Hypnosis is a non evasive form of therapy and is often used to help people to overcome a variety of anxieties as it has the ability to go deep into the subconscious part of our brain.

As in.. when we hear hypnosis,

Why is that useful when it comes to birth?

When it comes to hypnobirthing, its all about trying to create a reframe within the mind and reinforce positive thoughts about ourselves, our bodies and of course birth itself.

Some people aren’t suspectable to hypnosis yet for the hundreds of women and parents to be that I’ve worked with – many have really enjoyed using hypnosis tracks to prepare for their birth and have even used hypnobirthing in labour.

The sorts of things that we talk about during the relaxations is imagining yourself in nature or it might be preparing to meet your baby for the first time.. its all really simple but powerful stuff.

I would like to stress that there are loads of different types of techniques that I share with families preparing for their baby about during my hypnobirthing classes yet hypnosis still remains the most powerful tool.. hence the name, hypnobirthing.

Why do I love teaching families to prepare for birth and their babies?

I remember falling pregnant for the first time.

It felt exciting. It felt daunting. I began to question myself.

All within the first couple of minutes of that strip turning pink.

I almost felt a whole new sense of responsibility on my shoulders for the first time – a whole new human that not only I was responsible for but a human that I needed to bond with and birth too!

The shift in my mentality towards looking after myself for both me and my baby almost changed immediately – it sounds really weird but I really was in awe of my body for the first time, I respected it wholeheartedly.

And really… that’s why I started to explore how to prepare myself both physically and mentally for the birth of my baby.

And of course, that’s when I discovered hypnobirthing.. and the rest is history.

Hypnobirthing really gave me the focus and the tools to bring out that inner confidence that had been hidden within me for so long and when I really allowed myself to let go and birth on my own terms I knew that I had to share these incredible tools with the rest of the world.

Whilst of course, it helped me and my birth partner Craig feel a new sense of confidence when it came to birth – it helped changed my mindset on the world.

It helped me to in social situations where I was keen to make new mum friends, ones who I felt that I could really connect to and share the ins and outs of being a parent – not just the great bits or the bits where I compared myself and my baby to others.

Interestingly, when the pandemic started – I really wanted to be able to start exploring how mental health plays such a contributing factor during the early days in pregnancy through to parenthood – it became quite evident to me that being a parent meant different things to different people and really being able to lean into our instincts was something that still came with a lot of resistance for many people.

My passion for self development and being able to share what I’d learnt with parents made me start to see that it wasn’t just hypnobirthing or doula support that I wanted to support families with – it was finding our own voice, our own rhythm of being able to do what we feel is right for us and our babies.

And that’s why I do what I do – because I know how it feels to be in that place where your not sure what your wanting to do or say and through exploring beliefs about birth and parenthood – it helps us to really open up and discover who we really are and what matters most to us.

Elle’s Birth Story – The Birth of Odette – A Positive Caesarean Birth using Hypnobirthing


I was incredibly anxious throughout my pregnancy. Hypervigilant and quite concerned for mine and baby’s welfare.

I had lots of friends and knew of lots of women who really suffered through birth, and I was petrified.

I got in touch with Laura after repeated requests for a C section kept getting batted away – could you not try?

Are your scared of the pain? Have you thought it through?

I felt I may have to deliver vaginally and how would I do it?
Laura seemed like the perfect fit from her website, and I got in touch. The toolkit and anchors have been life changing for me.

After the course I decided to still advocate for a C section but knew I could give birth vaginally if I needed to. I was given a date at 39 weeks
and 6 days. This made me spiral a bit: what if she came early?

I rang Laura again and she coached me through this. I accepted the date and hoped I would get there.
At 39 weeks at 4 days I started with surges. My mucus plug had been coming away over the space of a few weeks and I had Braxton hicks. These felt different- like a waves of pain and were coming every 40 mins or so.

My stepdaughter was here so I tried to keep calm and waited for my husband to drop her off before and panic. Would I still be able to have my C section?

I had a hot shower, downloaded the freya app to chart my surges and went to bed about 8 to see how things progressed.

Soon they were every 16/18 minutes and I decided to ring Mac to get some advice. I wanted the delivery I had been working for. I spoke to a midwife who advised that no one would do a c – section on a Sunday night and to see how I got on.

If I had 2 in 10 mins to ring again. I used my hypnobirthing breathing with each surge and played the positive affirmations that Laura had sent me – my favourite being ‘all aspects of pregnancy and birth are safe.’ I got through each surge with the breath in for 4, out for 8 and I used my ball and the UFO acronym to help me.

My husband stayed awake through the many surges with me, occasionally dozing off– about 2am – it slowed, and I tried to sleep a bit. By 5 am, the surges were 4/5 mins apart so I rang MAC again and they told me to come in.

I was booked in at Jimmy’s but they redirected me to LGI. I used my breathing all the way in the car and felt very calm.

The contractions weren’t slowing despite the change of location and losing some of my anchors so this told me labour was quite established. We parked up and went in.

The midwife could see I was having surges and suggested a vaginal examination. I had said I didn’t want them in my birth preferences but I knew now was the time to make the decision- continue in labour or advocate for my section. I said to my partner if I was 4cm dilated I would try to deliver vaginally.

I used my advice from Laura on being honest and advocating and explained why I was concerned about a vaginal exam: the midwife was great and so understanding.

My husband held my hand and stroked my arm and reminded me of my breathing techniques and affirmations. I was 1 cm.

She said she could see the surges were very close together, did I want to have my c section today.

We used BRAIN and decided to have the C section. Things moved fast then: I was consented and had a canula before being taken to the delivery suite.
Several staff commented on how well I was dealing with the pain of the surges – I used my breathing throughout. I also refused pain killers. I wanted to experience how close the surges were together.


I had an amazing team – another of Laura’s affirmations came into play here – ‘you are safe with your trusted team.’ Lots of brilliant young women helped deliver my baby and I felt very empowered.

We went to theatre. Matt got his scrubs on, and I began the spinal block.
It was difficult with the surges but again used my breathing and Matt was too far away from me, so I did visualisation of a run I do on our family holiday to Spain and kept running it in my head until the spinal block was over. I then lay down and the C Section began.

Matt stayed by my head and he told me the story of our engagement, a technique we had practiced, to help me keep my oxytocin. We put on our wedding ceremony playlist to anchor us, and Odette was born to Here Comes the Sun by The Beatles: it was perfect.

We had optimal cord clamping and Matt moved with Odette to get her weighed. I had a small complication -a bleed which meant skin to skin was hard to do but I got to touch and kiss her, and Matt stayed at my head for the next hour. I continued with my hypnobirthing techniques.

Breathing was especially important. I had another complication later that day and needed another catheter – again I used my breathing to do this without pain relief.
Overall, I was so proud of myself and I had an amazing experience.

No small part of that was down to hypnobirthing and especially Laura.

What are the best things for me to do in early labour?

When it comes to early labour – so many people that I work with are really keen to understand ways to speed their labour up. But the truth is – there’s only so much that we can do.

The most important thing to consider is ways to help the labour to continue as undisturbed!

Here I share a few things that you might want to consider, you might want to spend some time talking with your birth partner about how they can support you incorporate them into your birth plan.

Share them with your doula if your choosing to have one or even let family members know the ways that they can support you when it comes to that start of your baby’s birth.

Continue as normal for as long as possible – probably the most important one.

One of the most best things you can do during latent labour or early labour is to continue in your day as best as you can.

That might be suggesting to your birth partner continues to go to work, continuing in your plans with your friends or preparing for your baby

Rest, eat well and hydrate – take the opportunity to conserve a little bit of energy. Often when I’ve spoken to people in labour – they’ve spent loads of time bouncing on their birth ball or exhausting themselves trying to progress the labour before its really become established.

Eat a really good meals – once labour really progresses, just like when doing vigorous exercise – many women and birthing people will loose their appetite for food.

So have a good think about the sorts of meals that you might enjoy – meals that will give you loads of slow release energy once it becomes closer to meeting your baby.

Drink plenty of water, energy drinks or coconut water – our uterus (or womb muscles) have to work really hard during labour, they open up in order for your baby to be born and they need fuel to work effectively.

Come up with an action plan in advance different things you might want to do – Often when we start to feel the first contractions in labour or we start to feel differently within our bodies, we almost freeze up and wonder what to do next.

Right down a couple ideas of things that you can do in case this happens, make a cake, ring a friend, have a task to do in your baby’s nursery which can help you to really focus your mind into something else besides what’s going on in your body.

Write them down and share with your birth partner who can almost guide you with it if needed.

Save some of your hypnobirthing anchors for later on – When it comes to things like birth breathing, I often to suggest to clients to get into a rhythm of using this pretty early on in labour to help you create an association in-between your surges / contractions against the calm breathing techniques. Its entirely up to you.

When it comes to other anchors – like setting up your environment, music playlists or massage save them until your labour really progresses and they will be so welcomed at the time!

If your looking for a hypnobirthing or antenatal course – why not explore the options available, with face to face birth preparation courses in Leeds and online for families further afield – there’s plenty of ways to prepare for the birth of your baby!

What do we cover on our hypnobirthing classes in Leeds?

Hypnobirthing is something that I recommend to everyone in pregnancy, whether its your first baby or your fifth baby. Hypnobirthing gives you and your birth partner the opportunity to understand not only how birth tends to work – it helps you to prepare a toolkit of techniques that help you to feel more in control during in labour.

Often, women and birthing people will look to start hypnobirthing in their second or third trimester to give time to explore not only hypnobirthing techniques, practice birth breathing but it also gives you the option to explore things in more detail if your still not sure what you feel is right for you.

Whether that be location of birth such as a hospital birth or a homebirth or if your wanting your baby to have skin to skin or vitamin k at birth.

The Happy Little Nest group face to face group hypnobirthing classes are a brilliant way to not only connect with other parents to be in Leeds, but they give you the opportunity to learn from other people and their experiences.

Group hypnobirthing classes in Leeds cover all elements of hypnobirthing such as breathing techniques, making informed choices for you and your baby, the birth journey and the birth partner role.

For further information – head to the antenatal section of The Happy Little Nest website to find out availability and when the next courses are due to take place or check out the what’s coming up bar below.